Sharks winning streak continues in Minnesota

first_imgST. PAUL, Minn. — Apparently, the home cooking also makes for a pretty-good meal on the road with the right recipe.After completing a perfect four-game homestand at SAP Center on Saturday, the Sharks extended their winning streak to five games on Monday, earning a 3-0 win over the Minnesota Wild. The Sharks kept the streak going by following the formula that worked on last week’s homestand: tight-team defense, solid goaltending and timely offense.With the win, the Sharks leapfrogged the …last_img

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Historic JetBlue flight to Cuba heads carrier conga line

first_imgAirline competitors are queuing to join trailblazer JetBlue after it Wednesday operated the first regularly-scheduled commercial flight from the US to Cuba in more than 50 years.JetBlue flight 387 made history when it crossed The Straits of Florida—that 90-mile wide swath of sea separating Cuba from the US — and touched down at Santa Clara Santamaria International Airport on the island nation’s once forbidden soil.The landing marked the first time in more than half-a-century that a regularly-scheduled commercial airliner from the US has flown any route to Cuba, this time nonstop from Fort Lauderdale.JetBlue 387 is the first in a flurry of US- Cuba flights that will be taking wing over the next few months. The US Department of Transportation had okayed half-a-dozen US airlines to offer flights to nine Cuban cities: JetBlue, American Airlines, Southwest, Sun Country, Frontier and Silver Airways.  On Wednesday,  DoT named eight carriers to provide service to the prize of the new pact,  Havana.Set to join JetBlue on the Havana run are Alaska, American, Delta, Frontier, Southwest, Spirit and United.The commercial aviation agreement between the US and Cuba allows each country to field as many as 20 daily roundtrips.JetBlue, has been given 27 weekly flights from New York, Fort Lauderdale and Orlando while rival American has been granted four flights a day from Miami and one from Charlotte, North Carolina.Delta gets 21 weekly flights to Havana, with daily flights from New York, Atlanta and Miami, while United will fly daily from Newark, New Jersey, and weekly from Houston.Alaska will fly from Los Angeles while the other carriers into to fly from Florida, where there big numbers of Cuban expatriates live.A US ban on tourism to Cuba remains in force and attempts to repeal it have been blocked in Congress by Republicans.  However, there have been no prosecutions during the Obama administration and Americans can travel legally to Cuba if they meet certain criteria.Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, who was on board JetBlue Flight 387, says the flights represent an effort to “re-engage with Cuba.” Part of that engagement for US airlines will be to make formal application with Cuban government for approval.last_img read more

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Mercury Vapor Lighting

first_imgLast week we took a look at fluorescent lighting, which is dramatically reducing our energy use for illuminating indoor spaces. This week we’ll cover mercury vapor lighting, which is the most common outdoor lighting in many of our towns.Mercury vapor is the oldest type of high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting. Light is produced when electric current is passed through mercury vapor in a sealed glass bulb. I’ll cover other HID lighting technologies, including sodium and metal halide, next week.Because mercury vapor produces light mostly at the ultraviolet (UV) end of the spectrum, the light from mercury vapor lamps—at least when they are new—is bluish in color and it doesn’t show off colors very well. In lighting tech-speak, it has a high color temperature (typically 5,600 to 6,400 kelvins) and a very low color-rendering index (CRI)—typically between 15 and 50. (For an explanation of these terms, see last week’s column.)Compared with newer HID lighting, mercury vapor isn’t very energy efficient. The “efficacy”—or amount of light produced per unit of electricity consumed—is 20-60 lumens per watt. This is better than incandescent lamps (about 15-20 lumens per watt), but significantly lower than other HID lighting.In fact, mercury vapor lighting is being phased out in the U.S.. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 banned the manufacture and sale of these products, effective in January, 2008. So it makes sense to replace older mercury vapor lighting with newer HID lighting, right?Well, it can get complicated, as I learned a few months ago when the Dummerston Energy Committee sought to save energy in the town by replacing the old mercury-vapor lights along West Street in West Dummerston with newer metal-halide lights. It’s a story that illustrates the challenges one can face in trying to do the right thing.A resident (and amateur astronomer) living across the West River from the village had approached the Dummerston Selectboard and Energy Committee about replacing the mercury vapor street lights because they created glare or light pollution, which affected his views of the night sky. I was interested, because it was an opportunity to reduce energy use in the town. We contacted Central Vermont Public Service Company (CVPS) about replacing the older lights with something better and they were very supportive, offering metal halide lights in either full-cutoff or semi-cutoff fixtures.As with most outdoor lighting along streets, the utility company owns and maintains the light fixtures and charges a monthly fee to the town based on the projected electricity use and maintenance cost; Dummerston pays about 44¢ per fixture per day for the 100-watt mercury-vapor lamps and would pay the same for the 50-watt metal halide replacements.We decided to test one of each of these fixtures before converting all dozen of the lights. Well, the neighborhood angrily rebelled and was about ready to run me and the Dummerston Energy Committee out of town. Part of the problem was that the lights were a lot brighter. Even though the new lamps used half the electricity, they were brighter—in part because, as mercury vapor lamps age, their light output drops. The light from the new lamps was also a lot whiter—a property of metal halide lamps. I think some of the complaints would have happened had we simply replaced the old lamps with new mercury vapor lamps, because the new lamps would have been both brighter and bluer in color. (Along with getting dimmer, as mercury vapor lamps age they become yellower, or softer.)More significantly, the fixture design was objectionable. Cut-off fixtures are designed to deliver more light downward, with less escaping horizontally as light pollution. Residents at one house, just across the street from one of the test fixtures, complained because the light shone into the house—part of the problem was that the electric pole on which the fixture was mounted was tilted away from the house, so the fixture’s light was directed somewhat upward. (I would have complained too!)For another resident, the concern was that the illumination didn’t extend far enough along the street. Too much of the street was “cut off” from the light, so there was concern about safety. While the light pollution was largely eliminated, so was the more diffuse light that residents had gotten used to.When we, including CVPS, looked for an older-style, non-cut-off, fixture for the new 50-watt metal halide lamps, we found that such a fixture doesn’t exist. Most outdoor lighting designs are calling for fixtures that reduce horizontal glare, and manufacturers don’t make the older-style fixture that disperse the light more widely. Cut-off fixtures work fine when fairly close together, but in West Dummerston we only have one fixture on every second or third utility pole. The new option just didn’t work.To make matters worse, once older mercury vapor lamps are removed, they are supposed to be replaced with the newer, legal lighting. For a while it appeared that by replacing the mercury vapor lights with something different we couldn’t go back. Fortunately, since our replacements had just been a test, CVPS was able to re-install the old ones. So we’re back to the drawing board, when it comes to both light pollution and energy savings. As those mercury vapor lamps and ballasts fail, they will have to be replaced with something. We’re hoping that, by then, there will either be more metal halide fixtures to choose from, or newer, affordable LED fixtures that can provide what we need.last_img read more

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ReadWrite’s Mission: To Map The Programmable World

first_imgowen thomas Tags:#ReadWrite Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Howdy. I’m new around here, as you may have heard. And as the site’s editor-in-chief, I’m delighted to join the community of readers, writers, thinkers, tinkerers, and creators who have flocked to ReadWrite over the past decade.It’s a natural reflex to ask, “Who’s this new guy, and what’s he going to do with the place?” Since Richard MacManus founded the site 10 years ago, ReadWrite has been telling the story of the makers of the modern Web. The way I see it, my first job is to tell ReadWrite’s story, every day — its past, its present, and its glorious future. Last year, ReadWrite dropped the “Web” from its name. That made perfect sense to me, because the two-way communication medium that MacManus wrote about has grown beyond the boundaries of the Web to take over not just the Internet but the physical world as well.Every aspect of the world we inhabit is becoming readable and writable — not just as text, but as code as well. Ubiquitous connectivity and computing power is hitting an inflection point of ever more rapid change. Just as media has become a business driven by conversation, not broadcasting, we now can all be contributors to the open-source project called Earth.We just need a map to where we’re going. And a guide. That’s ReadWrite.So what’s coming next? There will be new technologies, and ReadWrite will be here to explain them and grapple with their implications. There are a host of hardcore technical resources out there. We don’t aim to become one of them. But we won’t be afraid to geek out when a story calls for it — and break things down so everyone can take part.Mapping this newly programmable world, and everyone who’s helping to make it, is the chief project of ReadWrite, as it has been since its inception. That mission still guides us. Let’s read. Let’s write. And let’s execute.Photo via Flickr user eridony, CC 2.0center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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4 held for locking up woman for 15 years

first_imgPANAJI: The Panaji women’s police station on Wednesday arrested four family members for unlawfully confining a 45-year-old woman, who was rescued after nearly 15 years on Tuesday from a locked room of her maternal house in Candolim village, North Goa. Sub-inspector Reema Naik of the women’s police station told The Hindu on Wednesday that a case was registered against the accused under Sections 344 and 346 read with 34 of the Indian Penal Code. The victim’s two brothers, Mohandas and Ravindra Verlekar, and their wives, Anita and Amita, respectively, were arrested and released on personal bonds.The victim, Sunita Verlekar, has been shifted to a shelter run by the Institute Of Public Assistance (Provedoria), Ms. Naik said.During interrogation on Wednesday, the family produced a certificate issued by the State-owned Institute of Psychology and Human Behaviour (IPHB) in 2008, saying that Sunita suffered from undifferentiated schizophrenia-related moderate disabilities.Medical check-up todayThe Director of State, Provedoria, has arranged for a thorough check-up of the victim at the IPHB on Thursday, and the police have been requested to record her statement only after that.The police said that with the document produced by the family, a senior doctor at the IPHB will now trace her medical records and treat her accordingly.The woman was rescued with the help of activists from Bailancho Saad, a woman’s collective who were alerted about Sunita’s confinement by village activists.According to the police, the victim was locked in one room of a house, which belonged to her brothers. “One of the brothers, who lived in the same house with his family, would give her food through a slit in the door. But we found her without clothes in the room, which had no electricity. There was urine all around the place,” a woman police constable who was involved in the rescue operation had said on Tuesday.last_img read more

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