Rio 2016: Rafaela Silva wins judo gold for Brazil

first_imgSilva defeated world number one Sumiya Dorjsuren of Mongolia by Waza-ari to delight a partisan crowd at Carioca 2.The gold medal marks a fairytale rise to Olympic triumph from a childhood in Rio’s notorious ‘City of God’ favela for Silva.She qualified for London 2012 Games but was disqualified in the early rounds for a rule violation.London champion Kaori Matsumoto of Japan took bronze alongside five-time European champion Telma Monteiro of Portugal.last_img

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Chelsea, Liverpool and Man City run the rule over Inter Milan star

first_img1 Mauro Icardi in action for Inter Milan Chelsea, Liverpool and Manchester City have all sent scouts to run the rule over Inter Milan star Mauro Icardi, according to reports in Italy.The Argentine is quickly developing into one of the most sought after players in Europe, with several big sides keeping tabs on his situation.talkSPORT told you in January about Chelsea and Liverpool’s interest, while Manchester City are now believed to have joined the race for the 21-year-old.According to Gazzetta dello Sport, the Premier League trio were scouting the striker again at the weekend as Inter defeated Palermo 3-0.And the scouts will have been impressed as Icardi found the net twice to take his tally for the season to 15 in 28 appearances.Inter have no intentions to part with their star striker though and have slapped a £26m price tag on his head.last_img read more

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GARDA McCALLION FAMILY: ‘THEY PROTECT US, BUT WHO IS GOING TO PROTECT THEM?’

first_imgThe man charged with causing the death of Garda Robbie McCallion when he struck him with his car while trying to escape from a Garda road block has been jailed for seven years.Jamie McGrenaghan, 19, had pleaded guilty to dangerous driving causing the death of Garda McCallion in Letterkenny on March 26th, 2009.There were emotional scenes in court as Garda McCallion’s family praised the Gardai for their support but said they refused to accept any apology from McGrenaghan’s family. The heartbroken relatives sobbed at the back of Letterkenny Circuit Court as the sentencing was handed down.In a highly-charged courtroom, Judge John O’Hagan said it was a very, very serious case but one in which he must not seek to take revenge on Jamie McGrenaghan.Having said that he appreciated the fact that Gardai go out onto the streets everyday to protect the lives of the public.“Robbie McCallion was a member of the Gardai. An Garda Siochana go out to look after us. They are not called guardians of the peace for nothing. They take risks on our behalf,” he said.However in a lengthy summing up, he criticised public representatives for questioning the decision by him advising the jury to ignore the fact that Robert McCallion was a Garda saying he was merely following the instructions of the Minister for Justice.“Some people have decided to rush to judgement but that is a matter for them and their opinion. I will supply the law and that is what I will do,” he said.He then sentenced McGrenaghan to seven years in jail for dangerous driving causing death and suspended the last year of the sentence.He further sent him to prison for three years for stealing a motor car and five years for the reckless endangerment of Garda Joanne Doherty and Shane Lavelle whe  he drove at them. He also sentenced him to three years for each of eight burglary and criminal damage charges.He also disqualified McGrenaghan from driving for life.All sentences are to run concurrently. A statement read after the sentence by the late Garda McCallion’s brother-in-law Marty Roughneen (pictured) said the family were very disappointed with the verdict of not guilty in the manslaughter trial last Friday.“We are very disappointed with the verdict last Friday. Members of An Garda SIochana do their duty day in and day out. Protecting the communities in which they work.“Their services are vital to the maintenance of law and order and that is what Robert was doing when he was fatally injured.“Robert was in Tara Court for no other reason than he was carrying out his duty as a Garda and to say the least we are heartbroken at the circumstances in hch he lost his life which should never have happened.“Gardai, as Robert did, often put themselves in situation where they risk life and limb. It is of vital importance that they are adequately protected  when they are carrying out their duties and in particular that there are appropriate safeguards in place to ensure that the fate that befell Robert does not happen again.“They protect us, who is going to protect them,” he said.The members of the McCallion family including Robbie’s parents Bob and Nancy, brother John, sisters Noirin and Deirdre and girlfriend Marie O’Donnell stood heartbroken as the statement but had already agreed not to say any more. They did finally thank all Gardai all over the country for their support.“Words cannot express our gratitude to the Gardai in Letetrkenny for all their help and assistance throughout our darkest hours.“You have been amazing and we very much appreciate the efforts you have made on our behalf as well as the work, both you and the State legal team, put into this case,” he added.Last week a jury unanimously decided that McGrenaghan was not guilty of the manslaughter of Garda McCallion.The verdict, as well as comments from Judge John O’Hagan that the jury should deliberate their verdict in a cold and calculated manner and that they should ignore the fact that Robbie McCallion was a Garda, has led to a lot of public debate.A Facebook site called Justice for Garda Robbie McCallion which was set up after the not guilty verdict in the manslaughter charge last week already had almost 7,000 followers. The overall details of the trial was recounted by Sgt Michael Finan’s before today’s sentence.He revealed how McGrenaghan and another man, Cathal Dunleavy, went to Tara Court to steal a car at Tara Court in Letterkenny during the early hours of March 26th, 2009.The men had been drinking but tests found that McGrenaghan was not over the legal limit despite claiming during Garda interviews that he was drunk during the incident. Gardai in a patrol car arrived as the pair were stopped while trying to get away out of the cul-de-sac housing estate.The Gardai decided to block the men’s escape route by putting their Ford Focus patrol car across the road.McGrenaghan reversed his red Peugeot car back up one hundred yards before accelerating at the Gardai and swerving away to the left at the last second.The then 17 year old claimed at the last minute he spotted a gap between the patrol car and a wall, which was measured later to be almost nine feet wide, which he “went for.”Gardai revealed how they could hear the screeching of tyres as McGrenaghan took off towards them reaching a speed of up to 40mph. However he struck the patrol car and the stolen white Toyota Corolla car sending Garda McCallion flying 15 feet up into the air and knocking over part of the garden wall and a pillar.McGrenaghan and Dunleavy were eventually caught and arrested by Garda McCallion’s colleagues Shane Lavelle and Joanne Doherty as they tried to run away.Garda McCallion was thrown into a nearby garden suffering serious head injuries and the emergency services arrived minutes later.Blankets were placed under his head and he was taken immediately to Letterkenny General Hospital.He died almost two weeks later on April 7th as a result of a serious head injury at Dublin’s Beaumont Hospital.Barrister for McGrenaghan Denis Buckley Vaughan said his client pleaded guilty at earliest possible time to the dangerous diving causing death and the unlawful taking of a car.He said he had been with a man who had 45 convictions and that McGrenagan was very much under his powers.GARDA McCALLION FAMILY: ‘THEY PROTECT US, BUT WHO IS GOING TO PROTECT THEM?’ was last modified: February 12th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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DONEGAL CHILD KILLER TO BE CALLED TO INQUEST

first_imgA coroner in the North says he plans to call a convicted child killer as a witness in the inquest into the death of a teenager murdered on her way home from a Co Donegal nightclub.Robert Howard was cleared of killing 15-year-old Arlene Arkinson at a trial in 2005. The jury was never told of previous convictions for killing kids.Last December, he lost a High Court challenge in Belfast to the Arkinson inquest even being held – his lawyers claimed it was a move to undermine his acquittal. Today sicko Howard appealed the north’s High Court ruling.The Arkinson family lawyer told the preliminary hearing they want to have the inquest heard as soon as possible and were anxious to keep to the provisional date of 11 September.They also urged a speedy resolution of the Howard appeal.Coroner John Leckey said he felt the Court of Appeal would give full weight to what he called “the dreadful position” the Arkinson family had been left in.She went missing after attending a disco in Bundoran in 1994. Her body has never been found.Mr Leckey also said it was his intention to call Robert Howard as a witness so the inquest would need to be held in a room secure enough to deal with a category A prisoner giving evidence.Howard is serving life for raping and killing 14-year-old Hanna Williams from Deptford, south London.Her body was found in a cement works in Northfleet, Kent, in March 2002.DONEGAL CHILD KILLER TO BE CALLED TO INQUEST was last modified: February 13th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Arlene Arkinsonbundoranmurderlast_img read more

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THE HOOPS REPORT: RANGERS BANNED FROM SPL – NO OLD FIRM GAME ‘FOR YEARS’

first_imgFROM NEIL DOHERTY IN GLASGOW: WE all knew this was coming, but when it actually happened today it sent shockwaves through Scottish football – Rangers will not play in the SPL next season.Ten of the 12 clubs – including Celtic – voted to exclude Rangers in the guise of a New Company from next season’s competition.Only Rangers voted for it, while Kilmarnock abstained. And tonight it appears Rangers bid to enter the Scottish Football League Division One is already hitting the rocks. At least 11 of the 30 SFL clubs have opposed that plan. Others have yet to take a decision.What this means for Celtic fans is this – there will be no Rangers game next year, and possibly for several years…unless there is a Cup game.Celtic FC admitted in a statement that there will be implications for the Scottish game but insisted once again that the Hoops are not dependent on having Rangers in the game.Celtic said in a statement tonight: “The decision to refuse access into the SPL was an overwhelming one and demonstrates the depth of feeling amongst everyone involved in Scottish football. “Whilst the financial implications of today’s vote for Celtic and for the Scottish game as a whole will be very significant, we have already stated that Celtic has a business plan and strategy independent of any other club.“In addition, we will be working with our other fellow SPL clubs in the days and weeks ahead to take all possible steps to maximise commercial returns, which remain crucial in these economically-challenging circumstances.”Rangers FC plc entered administration in February owing up to £134m to unsecured creditors. The company will eventually be liquidated and has been replaced by a new company run by Charles Green.It has emerged Rangers has been double-paying players through secret contracts for years, possibly 20 years. This allowed them to recruit big name players to the club. It has now left a serious question mark over its nine-in-a-row ‘success.’The newco has since seen 10 first team players refuse to transfer their contracts from the previous regime, including skipper Steven Davis and Scotland internationals Allan McGregor and Steven Whittaker. Steven Naismith signed for Everton today – and will be playing alongside Seamus Coleman in the EPL next season.Celtic’s statement in full is here:CELTIC Football Club today confirmed that it opposed re-admission to the Scottish Premier League by Rangers newco.Today´s decision to refuse access into the SPL was an overwhelming one and demonstrates the depth of feeling amongst everyone involved in Scottish football. Fundamentally, the Celtic Board has also been very mindful of the need to take what it believes to be the correct course of action in protecting the integrity of the game in ScotlandThe matter is now within the jurisdiction of the Scottish Football Association and it will be for the SFA to decide on the future of Rangers newco.Throughout the whole sequence of events leading up to today’s decision the Celtic Board has been of the singular view that the integrity of the game in Scotland is of paramount importance. Our only other consideration has been to protect the interests and right of the Club and our supporters.Whilst the financial implications of today’s vote for Celtic and for the Scottish game as a whole will be very significant, we have already stated that Celtic has a business plan and strategy independent of any other club.Our supporters can rest assured that we will continue to fight to protect Celtic’s best interests within the Scottish game.In addition, we will be working with our other fellow SPL clubs in the days and weeks ahead to take all possible steps to maximise commercial returns, which remain crucial in these economically-challenging circumstances. We will also play an active role in mapping the future of Scottish football.The fans are the lifeblood of the game and we know how strongly our supporters, and those of other clubs, felt about this issue.We are confident that Celtic’s fans, together with the supporters of all the SPL clubs, will now play a major role in rallying behind their clubs to ensure that Scottish football emerges stronger from this episode.During Celtic’s long and illustrious 125-year history, there have been periods of difficulty. At these times, our supporters have always stood shoulder to shoulder with the Club. We need our supporters to be with us now, more than ever.We know our own supporters will be acutely aware of the significant challenges that lie ahead.  We enter next season as Champions of Scotland and look ahead to retaining our title and to making an impact in a European context. We know how difficult this will be and we call on our supporters to join us in tackling these challenges, to take their place at Celtic Park, to invest in the Club and to continue to give us the kind of support for which they are renowned.THE HOOPS REPORT: RANGERS BANNED FROM SPL – NO OLD FIRM GAME ‘FOR YEARS’ was last modified: July 4th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:THE HOOPS REPORT: RANGERS BANNED FROM SPL – NO OLD FIRM GAME ‘FOR YEARS’last_img read more

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VENUES ANNOUNCED FOR FAI’S FESTIVAL OF FOOTBALL ACROSS DONEGAL

first_imgThe FAI has chosen Donegal to host its Annual General Meeting and also to stage its annual Festival of Football.It is hoped that a number of stars from the present and the past will attend some of the events.Listed below is venues the FAI will be visiting during the Festival of Football which gets underway in Donegal on Sunday 15th of July and finishes with the FAI AGM on Saturday 21st in the Mt Errigal Hotel. One of the most notable is a visit to Ireland’s only island football team on Arranmore.SUNDAY 15th JULY11.00 Moville Celtic12.00 Greencastle 13.20 Glengad United15.25 Carndonagh16.30 Rasheney18.10 Quigleys Point Swifts19.40 Inishowen League/Inishowen Youth League at Maginn Park MONDAY 16th JULY10.50 Illies Celtic12.00 Buncranna Hearts13.35 Aileach 16.30 Swilly Rovers17.25 Milford United19.40 Fanad UnitedTUESDAY 17th JULY10.45 Ballyare-SSS Camp11.50 Lagan Harps14.40 Eany Celtic16.05 St Catherines and Dunkineely17.30 Donegal Town19.00 Drumkeen United/Raphoe Town/ConvoyWEDNESDAY 18th JULY10.55 Letterkenny Rovers13.10 Glenea United16.00 Keadue Rovers17.30 Arranmore Island19.45 GweedoreTHURSDAY 19th JULY11.30 Dunlewey Celtic12.55 Illistrin15.00 Bonagee United16.20 Cappry Rovers19.45 Donegal Junior League Event- BallyareFRIDAY 20th JULY11.30 Finn Harps/Ballybofey UnitedVENUES ANNOUNCED FOR FAI’S FESTIVAL OF FOOTBALL ACROSS DONEGAL was last modified: July 5th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:AGMFAIFestival of Footballlast_img read more

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NCS D-V championship: Del Norte blocks last-second field goal, earns first section title in program history

first_imgChase Blackburn blocked a field goal attempt by the Jets with 16 seconds to play and Del Norte captured its first section in program history, downing Encinal 14-13 in the NCS D-V title bout Saturday night in Hayward.“Every kid tried as hard as they could on the play,” Del Norte head coach Nick White said. “These kids just play, that’s what they do. They have responded all year long.”Encinal struck first in the championship affair. Quarterback David Romero-Reinholz hit receiver Teddy Oliver …last_img

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Can Morality Be Darwinized?

first_imgThere’s a cottage industry within the Darwin empire that tries to explain morality in terms of natural selection.  Hardly a week passes without some new paper trying to explain why humans reward moral behavior and punish immoral behavior.  Some try to do it by finding morality in animals, as if to portray a continuity in moral motions between bacteria, fish, insects, birds, rats, apes, and Homo sapiens.  Others try to model morality on game theory.  How well do these attempts succeed?  Can they explain the outpouring of support for victims of Haiti?  Can they explain the soldier who gives his life for his friends?  Can they explain the person facing a firing squad for having given aid to the persecuted?Unselfish molecules:  One of the most extreme continuity approaches attributed unselfishness to molecules.  This bases morality back at the origin of life itself: “Unselfish molecules may have helped give birth to the genetic material of life,” announced PhysOrg.  When those RNA strands were struggling to get together, according to Nicholas V. Hud of the Georgia Institute of Technology, small molecules might have unselfishly acted as “molecular midwives” to enable the base pairs to bond.  It doesn’t appear that Hud was intending this model as anything beyond a metaphor, but he visualized a rudimentary form of morality right at the start: “a sort of ‘unselfish’ molecule that was not part of the first genetic polymers, but was critical to their formation.”Evolutionary forces:  A recent example of the genre is found in PhysOrg and Science Daily.  “Researchers have long been puzzled by large societies in which strangers routinely engage in voluntary acts of kindness, respect and mutual benefit even though there is often an individual cost involved,” both articles began, ignoring any input from theology.  “While evolutionary forces associated with kinship and reciprocity can explain such cooperative behavior among other primates, these forces do not easily explain similar behavior in large, unrelated groups, like those that most humans live in.”    Enter the theory of Richard McElreath at UC Davis.  He and his team have it figured out in terms of market forces, religious beliefs and criminal law.  Their paper in Science used the E-word in the title: “Markets, Religion, Community Size, and the Evolution of Fairness and Punishment,”1 and extensively throughout.  Norms evolved; and with them, “Recent work has also tentatively proposed that certain religious institutions, beliefs, and rituals may have coevolved with the norms that support large-scale societies and broad exchange.”  They spoke of “our evolutionary history” and “Evolutionary approaches” to understanding our “evolved psychology” expressed in the “evolution of social complexity.” – evolution here, there, and everywhere.    It should be understood that fairness, norms, religion, trust and other moral terms were used without reference to absolute standards.  They are mere props in a behavioral model seeking to understand how evolutionary forces produce observed behaviors.  They treated these words as mathematical terms: e.g., “Theoretical arguments suggest that punishment (MAO) should be related more directly to the natural logarithm of CS [community size], because the effectiveness of reputational systems decays in rough proportion to this variable.”  The “experiments” they talked about were really games: “we used three experiments that were designed to measure individuals’ propensities for fairness and their willingness to punish unfairness across 15 populations that vary in their degree of market integration and their participation in world religions,” they said.  “Our three experiments are the Dictator, Ultimatum, and Third-Party Punishment Games.”  Volunteers in these made-up games acted as proxy lab rats for real human populations under evolutionary forces.  (The reader should remember that “evolutionary forces” are passive like the bumpers in a pinball game.)    The study, funded in part by taxpayer dollars via the National Science Foundation, “found that overt punishment, religious beliefs that can act as a form of psychological punishment and market integration each were correlated with fairness in the experiments.”  It doesn’t appear that “fairness” was given any non-question-begging definition in their model.  Those punished probably thought it was unfair.  And was it fair for the researchers to take taxpayer dollars to treat their fellow human beings as lab rats?    Karla Hoff of the World Bank, commenting on this paper in the same issue of Science,2 saw that same evolutionary forces in her vision: “A society is not just a random group of people with a shared territory,” she said.  “It is a group that shares cognitive frames and social norms.  We cannot know for certain how fairly our ancestors in foraging bands behaved in situations lacking relationship information, but Henrich et al. bring us a closer understanding by studying people in simple societies that may be very like those of our early ancestors.”Greenbeard altruism:  The prior week in Science,3 Stuart A. West and Andy Gardner of Oxford gave a more traditional Darwinian account of altruism.  They defended Hamilton’s theory of inclusive fitness that “showed how natural selection could lead to behaviors that decrease the relative fitness of the actor and also either benefit (altruism) or harm (spite) other individuals.”  All they felt they had to do was clean up a few contentious issues:Here, we show how recent work has resolved three key debates, helping clarify how Hamilton’s theoretical overview links to real-world examples, in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans: Is the evolution of extreme altruism, represented by the sterile workers of social insects, driven by genetics or ecology?  Does spite really exist in nature? And, can altruism be favored between individuals who are not close kin but share a ‘greenbeard’ gene for altruism?That odd “greenbeard” term refers to any genetic marker (such as a green beard) that – well, let them explain: “Dawkins proposed the hypothetical example of a gene that gives rise to a green beard while simultaneously prompting individuals with green beards to direct cooperation toward other green-bearded individuals.”   One of their diagrams even includes cartoon figures of men, some with green beards and some without (see “Beard Chromodynamics,” 03/31/2006).  They dispensed with the problem of “falsebeards” (cheats) who might sport the marker without performing the behavior, thus reaping the benefit without paying the cost.  They said altruistic greenbeards have been found in slime molds, yeast, bacteria, and a lizard – but the greenbeard trait is amoral.  It could just as well be a marker for spite.    It’s clear that West and Gardner are in the continuity camp: i.e., they view human morality as continuous with animal behavior observed in social insects and microbes.  So is morality due to genetics or ecology?  Both, they concluded.  Did they miss something in their either-or formulation?  Whatever; right from the opening sentence, their paper started on a Darwinian foot: “Darwin’s (1) theory of natural selection explains both the process and the purpose of adaptation.”  That (1) in the quote gave pride of place to Darwin’s Origin of Species as first entry in the list of references.  They also praised Darwin later (after discussing Hamilton’s and Fisher’s extensions to selection theory), saying, “inclusive fitness is not simply a concept that relates to interactions between relatives; it is our modern interpretation of Darwinian fitness, providing a general theory of adaptation.”  (See “Fitness for Dummies, 10/29/2002).Evolving morals:  The most recent article in the evolution-morality tale genre was Paul Bloom’s Opinion article in today’s Nature,4 “How do morals change?”  Right at the outset, he asked, “Where does morality come from?”  For answers, he looked to atheist philosopher David Hume (certainly not to Moses or Jesus), noting that “Babies as young as six months judge individuals on the way that they treat others and even one-year-olds engage in spontaneous altruism.”  To many psychologists, Bloom says, the fact that “a rudimentary moral sense is universal and emerges early” means it is a non-rational (i.e., unreasoned) aspect of our biology.  We rationalize it later; but really, according to some, “we have little conscious control over our sense of right and wrong.”  Theologians used to refer to this as a conscience.    Bloom thinks this view of morality, “in its wholesale rejection of reason,” will be proved wrong.  Why?  Because it cannot explain why morality evolves, he argued.  We can change our minds about moral standards.  We can be persuaded, and persuade others.  He pointed to evolving views of racial minorities and homosexuality as examples.  Not even the “contact hypothesis” (that our views evolve as our circle of contacts enlarges) explains this.  “It doesn’t account for how our moral attitudes can change towards those with whom we never directly associate – for example, why some of us give money and even blood to people with whom we have no contact and little in common.”  He even found flaws in the typical Darwinian explanations for morality: “There have been attempts to explain such long-distance charity through mechanisms such as indirect reciprocity and sexual selection, which suggest that individuals gain reproductive benefit from building a reputation for being good or helpful.  But this begs the question of why such acts are now seen as good when they were not in the past.”    What is missing, Bloom argued, is the role of deliberate persuasion in morality.  “Stories emerge because people arrive at certain views and strive to convey them to others,” he explained.  “It is this generative capacity that contemporary psychologists have typically ignored.”  He sees humans as “natural storytellers, [who] use narrative to influence others, particularly their own children.”  But what about his initial question of infants engaging in spontaneous altruism?  And how can we be sure he is not telling us a story himself?  Whatever questions might be posed back to Bloom, he is one of very few evolutionists seeing shortcomings in a strict materialistic or behavioristic account of human morality.  “Psychologists have correctly emphasized that moral views make their impact by being translated into emotion,” he ended.  “A complete theory must explain where these views come from in the first place.”  Though he spoke of morals evolving, he offered no Darwinian theory for them.In all but the last of these papers, preachers and theologians were assigned a status no different than worker bees in a hive, fruiting bodies in a slime mold, or yeast cells in dough.  What a different interpretation has arisen these days in the Apostle Paul’s proverb, “A little leaven leavens the whole lump” (Galatians 5:9).1.  Henrich, Ensminger, McElreath et al, “Markets, Religion, Community Size, and the Evolution of Fairness and Punishment,” Science, 19 March 2010: Vol. 327. no. 5972, pp. 1480-1484, DOI: 10.1126/science.1182238.2.  Karla Hoff, “Fairness in Modern Society,” Science, 19 March 2010: Vol. 327. no. 5972, pp. 1467-1468, DOI: 10.1126/science.1188537.3.  Stuart A. West and Randy Gardner, “Altruism, Spite, and Greenbeards,” Science, 12 March 2010: Vol. 327. no. 5971, pp. 1341-1344, DOI: 10.1126/science.1178332.4.  Paul Bloom, “Opinion: How do morals change?”, Nature 464, 490 (25 March 2010) | doi:10.1038/464490a.The Darwinians never include themselves in their models, or their models would implode.  They presume to teach the rest of humanity from some exalted plane of science.  Yet if they were consistent, we would have to conclude their scientific reasoning is also a behavior determined by natural selection.  (Notice that they devised games for their human subjects, but did not ask what game they themselves were pawns in.)  To them, morality is just an effect of an essentially amoral process.  It’s no different from what happens in any other organism.  In fact, Darwinian reasoning kind of resembles a slime mold in a sandwich, or a fruit fly larva population in an apple.    It’s ironic that these Darwinians often refer to yeast behavior in their evolutionary models of altruism, because their views are like the spreading, corrupting influence often used metaphorically in Scripture of leaven.  Jesus said to his disciples, “Beware the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees” (Matthew 16:6-12), referring to their doctrines.  Today’s disciples need to beware of the leaven of the Pharces and Sadducers, otherwise known as Darwinists.  The other metaphor Jesus used was the gradual spread of the kingdom of the God through the world, silently like a small bit of leaven in dough (Matthew 13:33).  Today’s disciples need to beware of the corrupting leaven of Darwinism, while working to spread their beneficial influence through the world.  It’s the battle of the leavens.**If the Christian leaven won, the Darwinists, on purely theoretical grounds, could not complain.  Why?  Because evolution is what evolution does.  The defeat of Darwinism would fit their model.  The Christians would be the altruists winning against the cheaters.  So why fight it, Darwinists?  Stop cheating and let the good guys win.  In fact, join the good guys and help them out, to increase the fitness of the population.  Step one: abandon Darwinism.(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Boeing bullish on future

first_imgAs Boeing celebrates its 100th anniversary Chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg says the company is arguably in as strong a position as any time in its history.“But that said, the market place is tough and competitive with economics challenges around the globe that we have to deal with and while we are in a strong position, we can’t stand still,” Mr Muilenburg told a media round table at the 2016 Farnborough Air Show.And in a warning to competitors Mr Muilenburg said the company was “playing offense not defence” as it approaches the future. “We are positioning ourselves for the future with work on productivity and competitiveness and investing in innovation.”But Mr Muilenburg said Boeing will not be rushed into any early decisions on building a new aircraft to serve what is now called the middle of the market (MOM) between its 180-220 seat single aisle 737s and the much larger twin-aisle 270-330 seat 787.The company, which is the world’s largest producer of aircraft, has a full plate with certifying and delivering the new upgraded 737, the MAX, a larger version of the 787, the -10 and the new larger and longer range versions of the Boeing 777 – the 777-8X/9X. Boeing will deliver the first 737 MAX next year, the 787-10 in 2018 and the 777X in 2020.With regard to the 787 development costs, Mr Muilenburg said that the company is now delivering cash on each 787 delivered. “We have delivered more than 400 and we have a backlog of firm orders of more than 700. The aircraft is doing very well and the operating costs of 20 to 25 per cent better is being delivered.”What is significant said Mr Muilenburg is that the 787 has opened up 100 new routes since it was introduced into service.“We are now in a positive cash position on the [787] program and we have the rate up to 12 a month,” he said. Mr Muilenburg added that now that the 787 supply chain was stable Boeing was working with suppliers to drive greater efficiencies.“The opportunities to expand the current order book are clear.” Some analysts suggest that Boeing will build between 3,000 and 4,000 787s, which would make it the industry’s most successful wide body program.Mr Muilenburg said that orders for its narrow body 737 program were very strong and the production rate is climbing from the current 42 a month to 47, then to 52 and finally 57 by 2019. “We are oversold,” he said. Boeing will deliver the first 737 MAX ahead of schedule in the second quarter of 2017.“However the wide-body market is a little hesitant,” he added but as he was saying those words, Boeing was inking a deal with Russia’s Volga-Dnepr for 16 more 747-8 freighters that will keep the iconic jumbo alive through 2019 when Boeing expects an upturn in cargo to breath new life into the program.By 2019 there would 200 to 300 747 freighters said Mr Muilenburg which would need replacing and the 747-8 was unmatched in the marketplace in capability. Currently, Boeing is building 747s at a rate of just 6 aircraft a year – its lowest rate ever.last_img read more

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Rabie, Combrinck victorious in JoBerg2c

first_img Woolcock, the 2012 champion, said he and Lill were extremely disappointed with the result.‘Stage wins were nice’ “We came here to win, not to finish second. The stage wins were nice, but we would have liked the overall title.” Delighted Old Mutual’s Mokaedi Dilotsotlhe said as the title sponsor they were delighted with the success and excitement of the fifth edition of the race. Forced to stop for repairs, the Cannondale-Blend riders saw their overall lead of more than six minutes ebb away. They fought back to finish sixth on the stage in 2:57:51 to fall one place in the general classification. Mixed category Sasol Racing’s Yolande de Villiers and Franso Steyn won the stage in 3:07:52 and with it the mixed category (36:50:51). Second, in 3:12:41, were Leana de Jager and Johan Labuschagne (37:16:51). “That’s the thing with mountain biking, it’s never over till it’s over – not even in the last 20km of a nine-day stage race.” ‘A bit unlucky’ “I think it’s a bit unlucky for them, but yesterday we had our bad luck again with two flats and a cracked rim,” said Rabie, who made his joBerg2c debut. Final stage win Max Knox and Kevin Evans of FedGroup-Itec outsprinted Rabie and Combrinck by a single second to win the final stage in 2:48:04 and in the process secured third place in the overall standings in 34:45:27. 6 May 2014 Fortune smiled on Johann Rabie and Gawie Combrinck as they rode safely into Scottburgh to claim their maiden win in the 880km, nine-day, Old Mutual joBerg2c mountain bike race on the KwaZulu-Natal south coast on Saturday. Third on the stage belonged to Louis-Bresler Knipe and Craig Boyes of Contego, who came home in 2:55:48 to secure fourth overall in 35:26:47.Ding-dong battle South Africa’s longest fully serviced stage race was largely characterised by a ding- dong battle between EAI Cycling and Cannondale-Blend, with the teams claiming three and four stage wins respectively. While both pairs were alternately plagued by mechanical issues, it was Woolcock and Lill whose title hopes deflated when they suffered a serious blow-out 20km from the finish on the 84km final stage. Woolcock said he had personally not felt on winning form during the tour. “But I rode myself in and, as we proved yesterday, we had the legs to set the fastest time on that part of the route.”Women’s race In the women’s race, Valencia Girls’ Amy McDougall and Janine King took a dominant overall victory in 40:35:55. The EAI Cycling duo sprinted across the floating bridge on the Scottburgh lagoon to complete the journey from Heidelberg on the outskirts of Johannesburg to the sea in 33:36:41. They finished three minutes clear of overnight leaders Waylon Woolcock and Darren Lill, who took the runner-up spot for Cannondale-Blend in 33:39:45. Avis Van Rental’s Alison Richardson and Rob Dormehl took fifth on the stage in 3:27:30 to finish third overall (40:26:14). They claimed their seventh stage win on the final day in 3:27:26, with overall runners-up Brenda Potts and Sarah van Heerden of Old Mutual finishing second in 3:33:59. Their overall time – 42:55:29 – was almost two hours and 20 minutes down on McDougall and King.. “We are especially proud of the economic contribution the race makes all along its journey to the finish. The joBerg2c is truly about racing, riding, touring and making a difference in these communities,” he said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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