Crédit Agricole focuses growth on retail banking

first_imgThursday 17 March 2011 8:55 pm FRENCH bank Crédit Agricole’s new plan to grow net profit more than five-fold by 2014 disappointed hopes yesterday for an announcement on possible asset sales.New chief executive Jean-Paul Chifflet unveiled a new target of €6bn-7bn (£5.2bn-£6.1bn) in net profit by 2014 as the bank shifts its focus back from investment banking onto its retail business.Analysts on average already expected the bank to be making €6bn of net profit in 2013 and €6.35bn the year after.Profits at the corporate and investment bank (CIB) division are expected to only rise to €1.8bn from around €1.5bn in 2010, excluding the impact of toxic assets kept in a separate portfolio, as it puts a cap on expansion.Group return on equity will in 2014 be between 10 and 12 per cent, the bank said, also helped by fresh cost-cutting at the investment bank. whatsapp Crédit Agricole focuses growth on retail banking Show Comments ▼ KCS-content Share Tags: NULL More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.com whatsapplast_img read more

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Who is Josh Adams: Ten things you should know about the Wales wing

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Josh Adams en route to a try against England in the 2021 Six Nations (Getty Images) Who is Josh Adams: Ten things you should know about the Wales wingJosh Adams made his debut for Wales in 2018 against Scotland and has been a regular in the side ever since – all of his first 30 Tests were as a starter. Find out more about the winger…Ten things you should know about Josh Adams1. Josh Adams was born on 21 April 1995 in Swansea. He stands at 6ft 1in (1.85m) and weighs 14st 11lb (94kg).2. Adams’s senior career has seen him play for Llanelli, Scarlets, Worcester Warriors, Cinderford (loan 2015-16) and Cardiff Blues, the region he joined in 2019.He also told Rugby World in 2015 about how he got into the sport: “I started at Hendy when I was about six. I played rugby and football until I moved into youth rugby, then the games were on Saturday so I had to choose.”Has Josh Adams always played on the wing?3. Adams started his rugby career as an openside flanker until he was 12. Coaches then switched him to wing or full-back and he now plays the majority of his rugby on the wing.4. Adams has represented Wales at U16, U18 and U20 level. He told Rugby World that former U20 coach Byron Hayward has had a big influence on him and his game. 9. He has recorded a time of 4.88 seconds to run 40 metres.10. He supports Premier League football team Liverpool and he regularly posts about the club on social media. From when he made his Test debut to his Rugby World Cup recordcenter_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Adams was the top try-scorer at RWC 2019 with seven. That tally included a hat-trick against Fiji in the pool stages.6. Adams was suspended for the first two games of the 2021 Six Nations after breaching Covid-19 protocols. He returned to the squad for their match against England and he scored a try in the Welsh victory.7. Adams’s grandfather is Irish and growing up he idolised Ireland international Tommy Bowe.8. In December 2020 Adams announced he was having a baby with partner and primary school teacher Georgia Davies. 5. He helped Wales win a Six Nations Grand Slam in 2019 and was part of the team that came fourth at the World Cup in Japan that same year.last_img read more

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COVID-19 threatens to hit indigenous communities hard as church leaders…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Indigenous Ministries Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Health & Healthcare, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service COVID-19 threatens to hit indigenous communities hard as church leaders step up support Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL COVID-19, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC The Rev. Bradley Hauff, The Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries, leads an April 22 meeting on Zoom with clergy and lay leaders who minister to indigenous communities.[Episcopal News Service] The meeting had no agenda. Sharing was voluntary. The Rev. Bradley Hauff made clear at the outset of the hourlong video conference call that he and the call’s 32 other participants were there to listen and learn from each other’s experiences in indigenous communities in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.“This is just an opportunity for us to share how we’re doing and what’s been happening in our regions, particularly in response to the pandemic and its effects on our lives and on our congregations,” Hauff, The Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries, told the participants.He and other church leaders have emphasized some troubling parallels between the varied regional experiences of American Indian tribes, which may leave these communities particularly vulnerable to coronavirus outbreaks. Villages often lack quality medical care, or residents must travel great distances for treatment. Many live in remote “food deserts” where clean water also is scarce, often because homes lack indoor plumbing, making it harder to wash hands frequently. Indigenous communities tend to suffer from higher rates of underlying health problems, such as diabetes and heart disease. And many Native American cultural traditions center on communal gatherings, from the Sun Dance to large family funerals – gatherings that now risk rapidly transmitting the virus.Such challenges and others tied to poverty are “just exacerbated” by the pandemic and by the restrictions on movement intended to slow its spread, the Rev. Paul Sneve said April 22 as he described for participants on that day’s call the latest conditions in the Diocese of South Dakota, where he serves as archdeacon.A sign welcomes motorists to the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Tribal authorities had restricted movement onto and off the reservation as a precaution against COVID-19 until April 26, when the lockdown expired and was not renewed. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceDespite such parallels, the range of regional experiences has been nearly as diverse as the American Indian tribes that were represented on the call. Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, for example, was on lockdown until April 26, when those restrictions expired. So far, no coronavirus outbreak has been identified there. The situation is more alarming for the Navajo Nation, which covers 27,000 square miles in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Tribal leaders there have implemented rolling curfews as they respond to dozens of new coronavirus cases each day.“We have resources that currently now are meeting the needs, but I don’t think we’ve seen the peak of this pandemic virus spread,” said Rev. Leon Sampson, assistant priest at Good Shepherd Mission in Fort Defiance, Arizona. He said the tribe and church leaders need to be able to respond effectively if and when the situation worsens. “This is going to get bigger and bigger and bigger.”Hauff began organizing these weekly calls on March 25 through the video conferencing service Zoom. Each Wednesday, he is joined by a mix of clergy and lay leaders serving on reservations or at mission churches. On the April 22 call, Hauff allowed Episcopal News Service to join the Zoom meeting and observe. Many of the participants were based in the Midwest, ministering to Episcopalians in North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Several represented the Episcopal Church in Navajoland. Alaska Bishop Mark Lattime and Northern Michigan Bishop Rayford Ray also participated.Episcopal leaders and congregations in Navajoland are supporting tribal efforts to address the outbreak there, said the Rev. Cornelia Eaton, who serves as Navajoland’s canon to the ordinary for ministry and is based in Farmington, New Mexico. “Communication is what’s going to get the needs to people and also building partnerships with other organizations in the area,” she said. Clergy also continue to tend to residents’ spiritual needs through prayer and worship.“Spirituality is really what it’s going to have to be about to get us through these moments of uncertainty, of fear,” she said.Indigenous ministers around The Episcopal Church have been taking various approaches to maintaining the faith life of their congregations since widespread stay-at-home orders and social-distancing mandates forced suspension of in-person worship.Native Alaskan villages in the state’s vast Interior region are largely without reliable internet service, Lattime said, but they often communicate with each other by citizens band, or CB, radio. On Lattime’s phone calls to some of the villages, residents put their phones up to CB receivers so he can pray with all who are listening on the other end.Navajoland has been expanding its online worship offerings. Eaton, Sampson and the Rev. Michael Sells, priest-in-charge at All Saints in Farmington now lead weekly Sunday services that are livestreamed on Facebook. Navajoland also has started using Zoom for Bible studies.The Rev. Marilyn van Duffelen also was on the April 22 Zoom conference representing St. Paul’s Indian Mission in Sioux City, Iowa. She told ENS in a separate interview that she decided not to lead worship services online because she feared it would encourage groups of virtual worshippers to gather physically in the few homes with Internet service, against the advice of health experts.Instead, “I’m on the phone a great deal, and texting is also quite a popular way to keep in touch,” she said.The Rev. Edward Hunt, a priest who serves 10 congregations on the Pine Ridge Episcopal Mission in South Dakota, began preaching sermons on Facebook from his office in Martin, South Dakota, in lieu of his usual rotation of in-person services at the various churches. Although Hunt didn’t participate in Hauff’s April 22 meeting, he has joined previous calls and found them helpful.“Everyone is concerned about their people, and they’re doing whatever they can to make sure that their people are protected well taken care of and respected and not ignored,” Hunt told ENS by phone.Hunt created a phone tree of his congregations’ contacts, and he typically makes about 20 phone calls a week to see how members of the congregations are doing and to pray with them. He also has wrestled with how to handle funerals during the pandemic while respecting indigenous customs. Oglala Sioux wakes and funerals typically span several days and can draw large extended families of several hundred relatives.“Asking people not to do that is a real hardship,” Hunt said. Even if families proceed with such gatherings, he has instructed the reservation’s priests and lay leaders to conduct only brief outdoor services for burials.Funerals are challenging for Native Alaskans as well, Lattime said. He sent booklets containing the Book of Common Prayer’s burial liturgy to clergy and lay leaders in the villages of the Interior region so they can officiate a simple graveside services, rather than full funerals. “When travel back to the villages reopens, people will be able to have a memorial service and really celebrate the life of the person who has died,” Lattime said on the Zoom call.The spread of COVID-19 over the past two months has disrupted everyday life across the United States and upended how The Episcopal Church ministers to communities in all corners of the church. Church leaders across the Anglican Communion have warned that indigenous communities worldwide face unique challenges in responding to the pandemic, and Hauff joined a meeting in late March to discuss those issues with the Anglican Indigenous Network.Furthermore, diseases historically have been a “particularly sensitive” topic for indigenous communities in North America, where devastating outbreaks resulted from early European colonization, Hauff said.“We as a people have seen this happen,” Hauff, who is Lakota, told ENS in a phone interview. “Europeans brought diseases, and sometimes they purposely introduced pathogens to indigenous villages, and we had no immunity to them and whole tribes were wiped out.”One way the coronavirus pandemic differs from past outbreaks is its subtlety, Hauff said. Although more than 50,000 Americans have died, most cases are mild and do not require hospitalization – which, Hauff said, sometimes makes it more difficult to persuade Native Americans to take precautions necessary to stop its spread. Reports indicate that data on the coronavirus’ spread among American Indian patients is not being closely tracked because of how governments are recording racial demographics.Many tribal leaders, however, are taking the threat seriously – closing off Alaskan villages, restricting movement on and off reservations and urging residents to avoid large gatherings.The Navajo Nation’s measures have included 57-hour curfews each weekend under the tribe’s declaration of a state of emergency on the reservation. This week, the number of confirmed COIVID-19 cases there topped 1,700, including at least 59 deaths.“Let’s continue to stay home, unless you have an emergency or if you need food or medication, to slow the spread of the virus,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said in an April 26 news release. “Now is not the time to let our guard down. Let’s keeping fighting COVID-19 together.”The Rev. Cornelia Eaton, the Episcopal Church in Navajoland’s canon to the ordinary for ministry, participates in the April 22 meeting on Zoom with other clergy and lay leaders serving indigenous communities.During the April 22 Zoom meeting with indigenous ministers, the discussion included highlights of fundraising efforts by the Diocese of Northern Michigan to support Navajoland. Some on the call suggested other ways people around The Episcopal Church can send help.Minnie Steele, a lay leader from the Episcopal Church in Minnesota, shared news that First Nations Kitchen, a feeding ministry at All Saints Indian Mission in Minneapolis, has stopped serving its weekly meals. Meal organizers hope to reopen as conditions improve, when there is less risk of spreading the coronavirus to guests and volunteers.Eaton, in Navajoland, said no one knows how this crisis will evolve or when it will end, but she is encouraged by the ways Episcopalians are being true to their Baptismal Covenant.“Everybody’s doing their best,” Eaton said. “This is for the long haul, and we need to support each other.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ By David PaulsenPosted Apr 28, 2020 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

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Daniels Lane / Blaze Makoid Architecture

first_imgArchDaily Daniels Lane / Blaze Makoid ArchitectureSave this projectSaveDaniels Lane / Blaze Makoid Architecture “COPY” Architects: Blaze Makoid Architecture Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/781338/daniels-lane-blaze-makoid-architecture Clipboard Houses Year:  CopyAbout this officeBlaze Makoid ArchitectureOfficeFollowProductsWoodStoneConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesSagaponackNew YorkUnited StatesPublished on February 05, 2016Cite: “Daniels Lane / Blaze Makoid Architecture” 05 Feb 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Classic™ SeriesVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ AbstractFaucetshansgroheKitchen Mixers – Talis MShower ColumnsAXORShowers – AXOR LampShower by NendoWoodBruagRoom Acoustics – Interior Cladding PanelsPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesIsland Exterior FabricatorsMega-Panel Facade SystemsConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMTable LampsAxolightTable Lights – SkirtDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Glass Pivot Door – Rabel 8700 Slim Super ThermalUrban ShadingPunto DesignPublic Architecture in Residential ComplexExterior DeckingHouse of BambooDecking – BambooAnti-Corrosive CoatingsTIGERPowder Coating – Drylac® Bianco 605More products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Save this picture!© Marc Bryan Brown+ 23 Share Daniels Lane / Blaze Makoid Architecture United States CopyHouses•Sagaponack, United States 2012 Save this picture!© Marc Bryan BrownText description provided by the architects. Sited on a narrow, one acre, oceanfront lot, the design of this house was one of the first projects in the Village of Sagaponack to be affected by the 2010 revision to FEMA flood elevations, requiring a first floor elevation of approximately 17 feet above sea level with a maximum height allowance of 40’ and all construction required to be located landward of the Coastal Erosion Hazard Line. The location within a high velocity (VE) wind zone added to the planning and structural challenges. Save this picture!© Marc Bryan BrownNearby inspiration came from both the 1979 Tarlo ‘Wall’ House by Tod Williams and Norman Jaffe’s Perlbinder House, completed in 1970.  The two story travertine entry façade is accentuated by a six foot real and is detailed to appear to hover off the ground, accentuating the condition of the elevated entry.  A ‘cut and fold’ in the wall plane bends to allow for one large glass opening, from which an over scaled, wood aperture containing the main stair landing cantilevers.  In a nod to Louis Kahn’s Richards Laboratories at the University of Pennsylvania, a layer of service spaces run parallel to the wall plane creating a threshold prior to reaching the horizontal expanse of the ‘served’ entertainment spaces of the open plan living room, dining and kitchen.  Fifteen foot wide, floor to ceiling, glass sliding panels maximize the ocean view and open the house onto the ocean side patio and pool.Save this picture!© Marc Bryan BrownSave this picture!Floor PlanThe second floor is imagined as a travertine and glass ‘drawer’ floating above the glass floor below.  Three identical children’s bedrooms run from west to east, setting a rhythm that is punctuated by a master bedroom balcony that projects out from the wall plane, clad in the same afromosia wood as the stair landing.  Interior materials include poured in place concrete floors, Calacutta marble cladding and afromosia millwork.  Save this picture!© Marc Bryan BrownSave this picture!Floor PlanProject gallerySee allShow lessCall for Entries: A’ Design AwardOpportunitiesFoster to Break Ground on Norton Museum Expansion in FloridaUnbuilt Project Share Projects Photographs photographs:  Marc Bryan BrownPhotographs:  Marc Bryan BrownStructural, M/E/P And Sanitary Engineering:Condon EngineeringSURVEYOR:Squires, Holden, Weisenbach & SmithCity:SagaponackCountry:United StatesMore SpecsLess Specs 2012 “COPY” Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/781338/daniels-lane-blaze-makoid-architecture Clipboardlast_img read more

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What we’re reading: Rangers welcome full crowd, police chief testifies in Chauvin trial

first_imgAbortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Twitter Student e-commerce startup helps upcoming TCU designers grow their businesses printTexas Rangers welcome full crowd for first home game The Texas Rangers sold out their stadium for their home opener on Monday, one of the first full capacity sporting events in a year, reports CNN. The stadium had 38,238 paid attendees, said Rangers spokesperson John Blake, who described the sales as a sellout. The overall capacity of the new Global Life Field is 40,518, Blake said.The Rangers are the first Major League Baseball team to reopen at full capacity since the coronavirus pandemic began. Last year, MLB games were played without fans in the stands. Since Gov. Greg Abbott lifted the state’s mask mandate and other restrictions last month, businesses in Texas can operate at 100% capacity.President Joe Biden said in an interview with ESPN that having a full stadium was “a mistake.”Abbott declined to throw out the first pitch at the game. The Republican governor announced that he would be boycotting the MLB after the organization pulled their All-Star game from Atlanta due to new voter restriction laws in Georgia. Day six of the Derek Chauvin trialIn this image from video, witness Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo testifies as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides Monday, April 5, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool)New witnesses were brought forward to support the prosecution of Derek Chauvin on Monday, including the doctor who cared for George Floyd before pronouncing him dead and the Minneapolis police chief, according to The New York Times.Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, is accused of killing Floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes. Chief Medaria Arradondo of the Minneapolis Police Department said in his testimony that many of Chauvin’s actions “absolutely” violated policies, especially after Floyd was initially subdued.“Once Mr. Floyd had stopped resisting, and certainly once he was in distress, and trying to verbalize that, that should’ve stopped,” said Arradondo.The prosecution also brought in Dr. Bradford Wankhede Langenfeld, the emergency room physician who tried to save Floyd’s life for 30 minutes before pronouncing him dead. In his testimony, the doctor said that Floyd’s heart was not beating by the time he came to the hospital. He also said Floyd’s death was likely due to a lack of oxygen.The defense is expected to claim that Chauvin was following his police training and that Floyd’s death may have been due to drug use.A single dose of a two-dose vaccine may be effective in people who have already had coronavirus, new study says In this Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021, file photo, a pharmacist prepares a syringe with Pfizer’s vaccine at a COVID-19 vaccination site in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)According to the U.S. News & World Report, growing evidence supports a new study that tests whether a single dose of what is designed to be a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine could potentially be sufficient to protect those who’ve already been infected with COVID-19. The study may help distribution efforts where vaccines are limited by maximizing doses. Those who have not been previously infected would still receive two doses.The researchers measured antibody levels of over a thousand health care workers in the Cedars-Sinai system who received at least one dose of the two-dose Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. The study used surveys from the health care workers to determine how many had been infected with the coronavirus. The group who reported prior infection received a single dose.The single-dose group had similar COVID-19-specific antibody levels to those with no prior infection and two doses, according to the study.“Our findings extend those from smaller studies reported elsewhere and support a potential strategy of providing a single dose of vaccine to persons with a confirmed prior history of coronavirus infection, along with two doses for people not previously infected,” said researcher Dr. Susan Cheng. The study notes that further research is necessary to guide COVID-19 vaccination policy. Katherine Lesterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-lester/ Students debut performances of drag personas as part of unique new course Katherine Lester Fans fill the stands at Globe Life Field during the first inning of a baseball game between the Texas Rangers and the Toronto Blue Jays, Monday, April 5, 2021, in Arlington, Texas. The Rangers are set to have the closest thing to a full stadium in pro sports since the coronavirus shutdown more than a year ago. (AP Photo/Jeffrey McWhorter) ReddIt TCU students show off years of work at first virtual honors research forum Linkedin Previous articleSecond phase of Fort Worth Zoo renovation project to open in mid-AprilNext articleWhat we’re reading: Gov. Abbott issues order on vaccine passports, McConnell warns big business Katherine Lester RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR + posts center_img Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlines Linkedin Katherine Lesterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-lester/ Twitter Facebook ReddIt Katherine Lesterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-lester/ What we’re reading: Chauvin found guilty in Floyd case, Xi to attend Biden’s climate change summit Facebook Katherine Lesterhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/katherine-lester/last_img read more

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FHFA Extends COVID-19-Related Loan Flexibilities

first_img  Print This Post About Author: Christina Hughes Babb FHFA Extends COVID-19-Related Loan Flexibilities 2021-03-11 Christina Hughes Babb March 11, 2021 892 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / FHFA Extends COVID-19-Related Loan Flexibilities Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: Homeowners Gained $1.5 Trillion+ in Equity Next: Latest Look at Foreclosure Trends Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) announced Thursday that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the enterprises that the FHFA oversees, will extend temporary loan origination flexibilities designed to ensure continued support for borrowers during the COVID-19 pandemic until April 30. These allowances previously were set to expire March 31.Extended flexibilities include alternative appraisals on purchase and rate-term refinance loans; alternative methods of documenting income and verifying employment before a loan closing; and expanding the use of power of attorney to assist with loan closings.Certain temporary flexibilities including employment verification, condominium project reviews, and expanded power of attorney, are expected to be retired on April 30.As health and safety conditions improve, FHFA says it will actively monitor mortgage market participants’ use of all temporary measures and retire those that are no longer needed or not extensively used.In a previous statement, Fannie Mae said it “has taken a number of actions to help homeowners and renters facing financial hardship due to COVID-19. In addition to suspending foreclosures and evictions affecting homeowners, Fannie Mae extended eviction protections to multifamily renters when the property owner received a forbearance, reminded homeowners they are never required to repay missed payments after a forbearance period all at once, shared tips to help homeowners avoid foreclosure fraud or scams, and announced a new COVID-19 payment deferral option to help homeowners who are ready to resume their monthly mortgage payments following a COVID-19 forbearance. These and other resources we make available are part of our ongoing Here to Help education effort, aimed at helping homeowners and renters impacted by COVID-19 understand the options available to them.”FHFA Director Mark Calabria has said that the FHFA flexibilities and previously issued forbearance and foreclosure-moratorium extensions have been put in place in order “to keep families in their home during the pandemic.””FHFA projects expenses of $1.5 to $2 billion will be borne by Fannie and Freddie due to the existing COVID-19 foreclosure moratorium and its extension,” according to a press release earlier this year. “FHFA continues to monitor the effect of the COVID-19 servicing policies on borrowers, the GSEs, and their counterparties, and the mortgage market.”The agency’s actions Thursday represent the latest steps it has taken to benefit renters, property owners, and the mortgage market during the pandemic. FHFA will continue to monitor the coronavirus’ impact on tenants, borrowers, and the mortgage market and update policies as needed. FHFA may extend or sunset its policies based on updated data and health risks.Homeowners and renters can visit consumerfinance.gov/housing for up-to-date information on their relief options, protections, and key deadlines. Related Articles Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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A census of the black-browed albatross Diomedea melanophrys population on Steeple Jason Island, Falkland Islands

first_imgThe world’s largest colony of the black-browed albatross Diomedea melanophrys on Steeple Jason Island, Falkland Islands was systematically censused for the first time in December 1987. Colony area was estimated as 31·8 ha from high-altitude aerial photographs. Densities of both occupied and empty nests were estimated from counts in 31 quadrats covering 2·2% of the total colont area. Combining the colony area and nest density estimates indicated a total of between 196 600 and 232 700 nests, of which between 153 200 and 178 400 were occupied by breeding pairs over the hatching period. These results confirm the importance of this colony, and of the Falklands as a whole, to the world population of this species and provide a baseline against which to assess future population changes. Population monitoring is now essential as the foraging ecology of the albatrosses has been affected by the growth of commercial fisheries in Falkland’s waters over the past decade.last_img read more

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Utah Earns Split on Saturday at LeClair Classic

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailGREENVILLE, N.C. – Utah Baseball earned a split on Saturday, March 2 in the LeClair Classic at East Carolina.The Utes Friday night game against the host No. 9 East Carolina got suspended due to rain with the score tied at 4. That game was finished following Utah’s first scheduled game of the day against Western Carolina.In Utah’s game against Western Carolina they had everything working.Riley Pierce had his best outing of the season pitching 5.0 innings and not allowing any runs while having five strikeouts. In all, Pierce, Jack Liffrig and Jake Dahle combined for the first shutout of the season for the Utes.While those three were dealing on the mound, Utah’s bats were hot as well as the team scored 14 runs on 12 hits. Three Utes finished with multiple RBI led by Matt Richardson with three.Utah grabbed the lead in the second inning, scoring two runs on a Richardson single.After adding another run in the fifth, Utah only led 3-0 heading into the later innings, but that’s when Utah pounced scoring two runs in the seventh and then nine runs in the eighth to go up 14-0.In the big eighth inning, Utah sent 14 batters to the plate and scored the nine runs on four hits.Shortly after dismantling the Catamounts, Utah was back on the diamond to finish its game with East Carolina.On Friday, Utah found itself in a hole early trailing 4-0 to the host team, but rallied for one run in the fourth and three runs in the sixth to tie the score. Shortly after ECU got out of the top of the sixth, the rain delayed the game tied at four in the middle of the sixth.Out of the delay, ECU scored two runs in the seventh, but Utah came right back with a two-run home run from Chandler Anderson to tie up the score once again in the top half of the eighth.The Utes left two on base in the eighth, but from there couldn’t get anything going on offense. East Carolina put pressure on in the ninth and Dustyn Schramm worked his way out of it, but when the Pirates came back in the 10th Utah couldn’t hold as ECU went on to win 7-6 in extras.Utah’s 1-1 finish on the day moves its record to 4-5 on the season. They have one game left in the LeClair Classic on Sunday, March 3 against Wright State. First pitch will be at 8 a.m. MT. Tags: LeClair Classic/Utah Utes Baseball Written by March 2, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah Earns Split on Saturday at LeClair Classic Robert Lovelllast_img read more

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Christmas Light Festival brightens up St. Giles

first_imgThe streets of Oxford were lit up by hundreds of lanterns on Friday night to mark the start  of the Christmas Light Festival.Around 500 children from local schools carried lanterns in a procession up Cornmarket and St.Giles street to signify the beginning of the three day festival. The parade was led by a lantern displaying the face of Oxford philanthropist and car manufacturer William Morris on it. This was followed by handmade lanterns of all shapes and sizes, including a car, a plane and even a flying horse.The festival also showcased a variety of musical and dance performances, as well as a festive christmas market and fairground attractions. There was even a makeshift grotto where children were given the opportunity to meet Santa and his real life reindeer.Keble student, Dani Edmunds, commented that, “The fair had such an exciting Christmas atmosphere and it was the first time I’d been on chairoplanes for ages! It made me feel so festive.”First year student, Chee Man also enjoyed the fairground, noting that, “You’re never too old for merry-go-rounds!”Over the three days, the festival, which was co-ordinated by Oxford City Council and Ian Nolan Events, attracted thousands of people to the streets of Oxford. Many roads were temporarily closed to accommodate the festivities, including the whole of St Giles and some of Broad Street.This was the first time the festival had taken place over three separate days and Oxford student Claire Paulus was very enthusiastic about it. She said, “I enjoyed it, as frankly who doesn’t like a carousel or chairoplanes? I would happily go again next year.”Keble student, Christian Davidson, also explained that the festival allowed everyone in Oxford to come together. He commented that, “ It was lovely to see a full cross section of society participating, including the infant schools in the procession. As a suburbanite, it was also a rare chance to enjoy city events such as they are.”last_img read more

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News story: UK takes centre stage in immersive entertainment revolution

first_imgImmersive sports, performance and visitor experiencesThe demonstrator projects will develop immersive experiences in 3 areas; sports entertainment, performance, and visitor experience.PerformanceThe Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) will lead a consortium of 15 specialist organisations from the theatre, music, video production, gaming and research industries to create a live performance unbound by location. Audiences will use mobile phones, extended reality headsets and live streams to experience live performance like never before.Visitor experienceFactory 42’s consortium will create 2 multi-sensory, interactive worlds in London’s Natural History Museum and Science Museum. At the Science Museum, visitors will take part in a mixed-reality detective experience featuring high-resolution 3D scans of robots. The Natural History Museum will bring dinosaurs to life through the story of a palaeontologist’s discoveries. Shorter versions of both experiences will tour shopping centres across the UK.Sport entertainmentEsports – video games played competitively in front of a live audience – has the fastest growing audience for live sports globally. This project will create new esports platform called WEAVR that uses gameplay data to transform how remote audiences experience first esports, and further down the line physical sports.WEAVR will be developed by a consortium that includes ESL, the largest esports content producer in the world, as well as academics and innovators across immersive technologies, data-driven content production and broadcast.Leading digital and creative talentMinister for Digital and the Creative Industries Margot James said: A new era of entertainmentScience and Innovation Minister Chris Skidmore said: New technologies being pioneered in the UK, such as virtual and augmented reality, are fundamentally changing the way we participate in cultural experiences, from watching dramatic performances and visiting museums to playing video games. Through investments such as the projects announced today, the government and UK Research and Innovation will support the creative industries to innovate in exciting ways that will deliver new experiences for audiences of the future with accompanying economic benefits. The UK is home to some of the world’s leading digital and creative talent. Through our modern Industrial Strategy and multi-million-pound creative industries sector deal, we are bringing them together to give audiences a truly unique experience. The growth of immersive technology has the power to transform the way in which we watch theatre, play games or go to the cinema, and these new projects will demonstrate how we can take people closer than ever before to the live action. Find out more about the audience of the future challenge. Find out more about the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund. The market for immersive content is a global opportunity. The presence of international partners in these ground-breaking projects is a massive vote of confidence not only in UK research and innovation but in our creative companies who will ensure that the UK becomes a world-leading destination for immersive content production bringing the new jobs and investment that is central to the Industrial Strategy and the Creative Industries Sector Deal. Changing cultural experiencesUK Research and Innovation Chief Executive, Professor Sir Mark Walport, said: Global opportunity for the UKProfessor Andrew Chitty, UKRI’s Challenge Director for Audience of the Future said: We are now in a new era of how we consume entertainment, and these projects announced today could see us walking with dinosaurs and experiencing being in the stands of major football matches from our own living rooms. We have an impressive reputation of producing outstanding sport, cultural institutions and visual entertainment. That is why, through our modern industrial Strategy, we are building on these strengths to make the areas even more accessible and enjoyable to people, whilst supporting high-skilled jobs across the UK. A total of £18 million government and industry funding has been awarded to projects developing the next generation of immersive experiences. Using virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality, the projects will create cutting-edge immersive experiences which will be tested at scale on real audiences.The projects are part of the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s audience of the future programme, delivered through UK Research and Innovation. Through this programme, government is helping the most talented storytellers across the UK create engaging immersive experiences.last_img read more

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